Archive for the ‘The Twelve’ Category

  • The structure and organisation of the book of Jonah

    Jul 18, 12 • Jonah, Narrative, StructureComments Off on The structure and organisation of the book of Jonah
    The structure and organisation of the book of Jonah

    Jonah is carefully and neatly structured into four acts (the chapters): Act one: Jon 1:1-16 Pagan sailors converted Scene one: Jonah’s commission 1:1-3 Scene two: On a ship in a storm Jon 1:4-16 Jon 1:17 (MT & LXX 2:1) bridge Act two: Jon 2:1-10 Jonah talks to God Scene three: in the belly of the [&hellip...

  • Bridges in Biblical Narrative

    Jul 17, 12 • Jonah, Narrative, RuthComments Off on Bridges in Biblical Narrative
    Bridges in Biblical Narrative

    Like soap-operas, and other serials, biblical narratives with several episodes often seek to bridge between two parts. These bridges are often verses that serve to link one episode to another. We’ll look at examples from Ruth, Jonah and Genesis 2-...

  • Clumsiness in biblical narrative: Jonah 1:10 (Be afraid, be very afraid)

    Jun 1, 12 • Jonah, NarrativeComments Off on Clumsiness in biblical narrative: Jonah 1:10 (Be afraid, be very afraid)
    Clumsiness in biblical narrative: Jonah 1:10 (Be afraid, be very afraid)

    Biblical narrative is seldom clumsy and not often more complicated than it needs to be. So apparent clumsiness is usually intended to show us something. As I hope to convince you it does in Jonah 1:10.  ...

  • Humour in the Bible: book 28: Hosea

    Feb 23, 12 • Hosea, Humour3 Comments
    Humour in the Bible: book 28: Hosea

    In this podcast I’ll again argue that Robert Carroll gets it wrong. Despite his own fierce black humour he fails to acknowledge its presence or at least its prevalence in the prophets. He writes about humour in Hosea in: Carroll, Robert P. ‘Is Humour among the Prophets’. On humour and the comic in the Hebrew [&hellip...

  • Understanding the Prophets: Part Two: Amos

    Sep 18, 11 • 3 simple rules, Amos, ProphetsComments Off on Understanding the Prophets: Part Two: Amos
    Understanding the Prophets: Part Two: Amos

    In Understanding the prophets: Part one I spoke about the “Three Cons” as a key to reading the prophetic books of the Old Testament with understanding and in ways which are faithful to their original intention. In this second part we’ll look at an example from Amos 5:18ff. and apply this approach. The result will [&hellip...

  • Jonah and the Essential Truths of Scripture

    Apr 3, 11 • JonahComments Off on Jonah and the Essential Truths of Scripture
    Jonah and the Essential Truths of Scripture

    The prophet Jonah (at least as his story is told in the book that bears his name) is perhaps the most orthodox if perhaps the most heteropractic (( The prefix “ortho-” straight or right and “hetero-” different or wrong are used as opposites. The endings “-dox” to do with worship or theology and “-praxis” to [&hellip...

  • Jonah 1:9 and the things Jonah says!

    Apr 1, 11 • Jonah, Narrative1 Comment
    Jonah 1:9 and the things Jonah says!

    I’ve already a podcast on Jonah 1:7-8 Direct speech in biblical narratives if you want a fill in between the last podcast and this one. Had you noticed? We were eight verses into the book and Jonah had not said one word. In Jonah 1:1-8 not a peep out of Jonah the prophet, so 1:9 [&hellip...

  • Jonah 1:4-5 : Big!

    Mar 31, 11 • characterisation, Jonah, Narrative1 Comment
    Jonah 1:4-5 : Big!

    In these two verses we get some more clues about how to read the book of Jonah, we’ll notice how everything is big, and how the ship has personality. I’ll suggest that Jonah is in some ways like a children’s story, larger than life and painted in bright primary colours. I’ll even suggest that there [&hellip...

  • E100-50: Malachi 1:1 – 4:6: The book that makes the bridge

    Jun 25, 10 • E100, Malachi1 Comment
    E100-50: Malachi 1:1 – 4:6: The book that makes the bridge

    Malachi is a short prophetic book, the name Malachi just means “my messenger” which seems to be what the speaker calls himself. It has no more details of time, place or person in the superscription (as most prophetic books do), but the content suggests Judah after the exile under Persian rule. The book opens opens [&hellip...

  • E100-49: Jonah 1:1 – 4:11: Jonah: a “Why’d he do it?” story

    Jun 24, 10 • E100, Humour, JonahComments Off on E100-49: Jonah 1:1 – 4:11: Jonah: a “Why’d he do it?” story
    E100-49: Jonah 1:1 – 4:11: Jonah: a “Why’d he do it?” story

    These four chapters tell the story of God’s prophet Jonah (who attentive Bible students know from 2 kings 14:25: He restored the border of Israel from Lebo-hamath as far as the Sea of the Arabah, according to the word of the LORD, the God of Israel, which he spoke by his servant Jonah son of [&hellip...